Field Repair

We’d reached an intersection and the boys were paused. I dismounted to take a look. “Oh, man.” Gary asks if it’s a broken spoke and I say that it’s way worse.

The thunk is familiar from having a loose quick release. My rear wheel doesn’t have a quick release. Instead, two stainless capped bolts secure the axle of the Alfine internal geared hub. The non-drive side bolt is gone, lost on the trail who knows when back. Way worse.

There are grave looks all around, we’re far from a hardware store. Gary grabs some bailing wire, suggesting wrapping the axle to hold it on a little. I look around the bike for a part to cannibalize. Not many bolts on fancy bikes, certainly not that size. We’re trading ideas, Gary is willing to fish out his spare chainring bolt, I’m scanning and waiting. My view about it is that, once the problem is presented and understood, there’s aggressive nonconscious cognition being applied to it. So I wait some more, still looking over the rest of the bike in an undirected way.

My hand finds the brake lever barrel adjuster lock bolt, in retrospect I bet like touching the thumbtack box in the classic candle experiment. It looks too small but I can’t tell. I pull it off the brake cable, it threads quietly onto the axle. Gary offers a tiny pair of pliers. The bolt is feeble and will get loose, but it’s not horrible. Cass says maybe put another one to lock it on. I pull the other one off, twist it on. We ride off. It holds through a hard day and, I’m hoping, for days yet.

20130127-081949.jpg

8 thoughts on “Field Repair

  1. I would never have expected that to work. Sounds like you lads are having a rollicking good time. I am there in spirit. Oh, and I fully agree with non-concious problem-solving, in fact, I believe most problems are solved at the subconcious level while the concious mind founders in anxiety and what-if scenarios. But in this case, well, that was a fortuitous fix, I think.

    tj

    • Thanks, Vik. Yeah, I was gutted and chagrined when that bolt went missing. Funny how folding/travel bikes are getting assembled and disassembled so much that stuff you take for granted on other bikes needs minding.

      Cheers and hope you are well.

      Joe

  2. This reminds me of using a platform pedal pin to replace the front brake pivot bold on formula brakes. Yep, same thread size. *grin* No need to stop downhilling, just fix the brakes with a threaded pedal pin.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s